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For Their Health

Being a dog parent is a lot of fun, but it’s also serious business, because as pet guardians, we are responsible for our canines’ health, wellness, and well-being. Knowing what’s right can be complicated, so Bay Woof this month turns to well-qualified veterinarians, trainers, and other pet care experts for guidance in diet, health care, dignified death, and exercise.

Kasie Maxwell, founder of San Francisco Raw Feeders, or SFRAW, discusses why dogs and carbohydrates don’t go well together in “Dogs and Carbs Are Not a Good Recipe.” A longtime proponent of a raw foods diet, she presents evidence about the value of a diet rich in protein, minerals, and fat, offering up some good resources for delving more into this topic.

Dr. Jenny Taylor of Creature Comfort Holistic Veterinary Center brings readers up to speed on holistic medicine—Chinese herbal medicine, more specifically—by highlighting traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine in “Chinese Medicine Gets at the Root of the Problem.” When she founded her clinic 2001, it was one of the area’s first to combine Western medicine and holistic therapies.

Sadly, death is the final stage of our treasured pets’ life cycle, and making a decision to euthanize is never easy. In “Mindfulness and End-of-Life Care,” Dr. Rachael Feigenbaum of Lotus Veterinary House Calls address this difficult crossroad and urges pet parents to use the principles of presence and unconditional love in the care of their beloved companions, especially with their palliative needs.

Whatever stage your dog is in, she needs stimulation daily, and two contributors have some ideas for you. First, Shelah Barr of Happy Hounds Massage describes K9 Cross Train in “Change Up Your Dog’s Exercise Routine.” Then Angie Allen of For Sniffs & Giggles offers tips on occupying your dog’s mind and body in “Give Your Dog Challenges.”

Yes, that is a lot to ponder, but it’s all for their health.