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Doing the Dinner Dance

As my collie aged, her appetite for many of her favorite foods flagged, so I tried everything to keep her eating regularly. I cooked chicken for her, and sought out Chinese herbs to add appeal and stimulate her appetite. I crumbled freeze-dried goodies on top of her protein-rich kibble, and I mixed in pumpkin to aid in digestion.

She was never a super food-motivated girl in the first place, which drove me to have lots of conversations with her vet and staff as well as the experts at my favorite pet stores for the latest and greatest in new, delicious options for picky eaters. A trooper, Annie did her part admirably as I experimented with ways to make her meals more interesting.

But it was complicated.

Pet food and pet nutrition are complex topics, but dog parents have more information and resources at their fingertips than ever before. This month, Bay Woof touches on that all-important subject.

Kasie Maxwell, founder of San Francisco Raw Feeders, has advice on how to start puppies on raw diets. A longtime raw-feed advocate, she believes in the benefits of a healthy raw diet and can get canine moms and dads headed down that path.

Ruth Villasenor, the co-owner of Oakland’s Paws & Claws, a Natural Pet Food Store & Spa, has observed that her customers have become more educated about pet nutrition in the decade-plus her Dimond district shop has been open. She is a big fan of raw green tripe and can steer consumers in the right direction.

And don’t forget treats. Beverly Ulbrich, the Pooch Coach, recommends assigning values to training treats, which she also notes shouldn’t be the only form of reward used for motivation. That notion is also echoed in Kelley Filson’s primer on mastering “Drop it!”.

Happy eating to all.